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Posts Tagged ‘chinatown brooklyn’

It is dragonfruit season. If perfect they are $5.99 a pound, and the slightly wilted ones are a dollar less. Though the fruit is lovely to look at, the edible part is described as slightly sweet and bland. It comes from the pitaya cactus.

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I’m trying to give this girl some space. I’ve just found out that the Hong Kong Supermarket has been replaced by an inferior-looking store with seafood in its name and I’m mildly upset.

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Four miles from the lake in Prospect Park… rubber duck found object.

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The sun is shining, people are happy and the vegetables are fresh… wait a minute – April Fools! This was a leftover picture from the fall. Today is gray and rainy in Brooklyn, but spring-like weather could arrive any day.

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These cost $1.79 a package. In simulated US money that translates into two counterfeit dollar bills or a twenty from a Monopoly game.

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The Chinatown fish markets do a lot of business on weekends. The crabs are still flopping around in the bushel baskets. Unlike Chinatown Manhattan, in Brooklyn they’ll tolerate people taking photos. (In Manhattan, the fishmongers yell, and stores post signs saying No Pictures.)

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Notice the white band on the dress: it says “MY FEET.”

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regular stop sign

No reason why a stop sign needs to be centered on top of its post, I suppose. It makes the sign more visually interesting, though few drivers probably notice.

very slowMore unusual is this sign from a Chinatown garage. A red octagonal sign with white letters always means stop, no matter how drivers choose to interpret it. The Dept. of Transportation has better things to do than enforce homemade traffic signs that are in the spirit of the original.

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dry cleaning plus

Tony Manero and Stephanie are back on the dance floor! Bell bottoms, platform shoes, 2001 Odyssey … it’s Saturday Night Fever. Tony’s right arm is itching to point skyward, and she is looking away, feigning immunity to his rough charm. Time has been crueler to Stephanie. Those pants look like jodphurs, or maybe the calzones caught up to her once the disco pace slowed down.

Pacheco dry cleaner, at Fifth Avenue just past 15th St., is about three miles from where the real-life disco stood. Torn down long ago, the neighborhood has become  Brooklyn’s Chinatown. (Learn more about where Saturday Night Fever at this movie location website.)

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